Mohammad Azmi Abdul Rahman

Azmi

Azmi

Mohammad Azmi Abdul Rahman

Azmi shot many pictures with directional light, which made a lot of them suitable for conversion in B&W. If you intend to convert your digital images into B&W you should search for subjects who are not only sidelighted, but they should have interesting shapes, form, texture, patterns and interesting relationships between them. B&W works best where there is a drama of lights and shadows.

Scaffolding
Scaffolding

High key patterns and rhythm in scaffolding erected for restoration work at Angkor Wat.

When there are several elements which are similar within a frame, their structure can present a unique pattern or rhythmic visual structure. It takes a practiced eye to see rhythms and patterns, and this picture is an example of what most people might never notice. You need time to perceive and appreciate the rhythm in a picture such as this.

Boy
Boy

The steel scaffolding is like a matrix while the darkened diagonal planks provide contrast. The pattern is like the beat of a musical score. It is repetitive and your eye perceives that it extends beyond the frame. The picture is completed by the workman in contrasting yellow. He represents the central focal point of interest, while the other man in the corner is a secondary interest.

As in music, rhythm and patterns create considerable strength and momentum in an image. Once it is recognized, the viewer has the feeling that it extends well beyond the frame. However, without the man, the picture wouldn’t be so strong. This is an excellent catch by Azmi.

Knife Sharpener and friends

Knife Sharpener and friends

doorway
doorway

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